Articles

Research Without Borders

By Chris Banks | Dec 28, 2011

At the time of writing, Chris was University Librarian and Director of the Library & Historic Collections at the University of Aberdeen.


In recent decades, some borders defining traditional disciplinary research activities have been dissolving. Indeed, the borders between some disciplines have increasingly dissolved. As these boundaries blur or melt, research libraries have to respond to these changes.

Understanding Information Trustworthiness in the Networked Information Ecosystem

Clifford A. Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information | Dec 28, 2011

As readers are confronted with an evergrowing and ever more overwhelming set of content offerings, accessible through an ever-multiplying set of channels and services, one hears a great deal of concern about the ability to identify “trustworthy” information. It’s clear that a key critical skill for the 21st century is the ability to assess the “trustworthiness” of information.

Creating a Library to Serve Patients and Their Partners

Gail Sorrough, University of California San Francisco | Dec 28, 2011

The UCSF Patient Health Library is a new library created in response to the demand from patients and their friends, family members and partners at UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion who wanted access to medical information.

COUNTER and SUSHI

Peter Shepherd, COUNTER | Dec 28, 2011

The question “What content can we trust?” has always been central to users of scholarly information and there is no simple answer to it.

Traditional indicators of trust have included the reputation of the author and the institute in which her or his research was done; the status of a journal in which an article appears; and the reputation of a particular publisher. More recently, citation data have become a popular, if overused, indicator, and now usage statistics have entered the frame.

Researcher Tools for Evaluating Trustworthiness

Carol Anne Meyer, CrossRef | Dec 28, 2011

Building on the authoritative scholarship of the past is a critical component of progress in academic study. How can researchers identify authoritative, trustworthy sources for their research?

CrossRef, the not-for-profit organization of publishers that makes reference linking in scholarly content possible, is creating tools to help researchers identify what content can be trusted. Two programs, CrossCheck Plagiarism Screening and the soon-to-bepiloted CrossMark program, address this need from different angles.

Go Mobile

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Yale University Library, Joe Murphy, Yale Science Libraries | Dec 29, 2011

Today's patrons expect information in the palm of the hand. Using cell phones as their primary interface, patrons expect university libraries to seamlessly meet their information needs on the go. Based on a poster we presented at the 2009 ALA Annual Conference, this article discusses leading strategies that innovative academic libraries are using to deliver services through mobile devices. As an example of how we walk the talk, through posting messages, images and slides to Twitter, Facebook and Flickr, we made our ALA poster mobile-accessible in real time.

Funding Innovation

Jay Katzen, Elsevier | Dec 29, 2011

One of our primary goals as a publisher and information solutions provider is to enable advancement in research. Doing that effectively requires that we not only understand and anticipate researchers’ fundamental needs and behaviors, but that we find innovativeways to improve theirworkflows.

The [first] chart shows absolute growth in research between 1996 and 2008, comparing non-Research4Life countries (countries not eligible due to their per capita income or Gross National Income), Band 1 countries (eligible with less than $1,250 GNI) and Band 2 countries (eligible with $1,251 to $3,500 GNI). The [second] chart shows the rise in article output in four countries that participated in Research4Life (Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Bulgaria), compared to Japan, which did not.

The most difficult part of getting published is finding an idea about which you and your colleagues are concerned, and presenting it in a way that makes your thoughts on the subject clear, cogent, and persuasive. If you have already written something up for presentation, you may be well on your way to publication in a professional or scholarly journal. That said, there are some points to remember to help make your journey to publication a smooth one.

In July, in Geneva, Switzerland, the UN World Information Property Organization launched the “Access to Research for Development and Innovation” or aRDi initiative. Participating in the program along with other publishers, Elsevier is providing the content from 28 journals. Eventually aRDi will offer 150 journals made available by STM publishers.