Articles

Recently, several major changes at my library have pushed us to be much more intentional about assessing our services, workflows, budgeting practices and resource selection. Through strategic planning and development of policy and practice, we have begun to lay the foundation for a culture of assessment in our library — a culture in which decisions are based on facts, research and analysis and where services are designed to maximize the benefit for our patrons (Phipps, 2001).

Here’s an Update on Elsevier’s ROI Study Looking at Academic Libraries

Carol Tenopir, University of Tennessee, Knoxville | Dec 30, 2011

In 2007, Elsevier launched a study looking at the return on an academic institution’s investment in its library. As you may recall, Phase 1 of this ROI study was described by Judy Luther in the January 2008 issue of the Library Connect Newsletter and in an extensive white paper. Both are available at www.elsevier.com/libraryconnect.

Phase 1 summary

The Norwegian Paradox

Per Koch, Research Council of Norway | Dec 30, 2011

Held in Helsinki in November 2008, the 6th Annual Library Connect Nordic Librarian Forum covered topics including research assessment and policy. During that event, Per Koch delivered a presentation which he’s kindly agreed to reshape as this article for Library Connect.
 

Swimming Against the Current

Daniel Calto, Elsevier | Dec 30, 2011

The world of academic research has undergone seismic shifts in the last 10 years, and has left under significant pressures all parties interested in the furtherance of outstanding scientific and humanities research.

Challenges facing academic research

Talking with a library lobbyist about “selling the library”

Jason Kramer, New York State Higher Education Initiative Chrysanne Lowe, Corporate Brand Elsevier | Jan 23, 2012

Earlier this year, I had the great pleasure of meeting Jason Kramer, the executive director for the New York State Higher Education Initiative, an association of the state's public and private academic and research libraries. Jason brings a skillset not often taught in library school and a practical perspective on growing the impact and influence of libraries in today’s society.

— Chrysanne Lowe, Vice President, Global Customer Marketing, Elsevier, San Diego, CA, USA

 

Updated as of July 23, 2015


Ever wondered what "Non Solus" means in the Elsevier logo? 

It can be a daunting task to try to publish when you’re new to any profession and I think this is especially true for newly-minted librarians. Typically, LIS programs don’t emphasize research and writing as much as other fields. The simplest advice that I can pass along to you is to start small and think big.

Writing and editing are dynamic, creative processes. At some point both author and editor must release the finished product and submit to the production process (more copyediting, proofing, and queries). To offer the best manuscript possible, keep in mind the following points.

Surround yourself with current reference resources.

Peer Review

Jan 4, 2012

Scholarship and research in library and information studies most often appear in journals, monographs, annual reviews, and conference proceedings. Those journals, especially the ones operating at the national and international levels, tend to be subject to editorial peer review – prepublication review.

Students pursuing master’s degrees in library science often assume they need their new degrees in hand to write for publication, but much the opposite is true. Every way we involve ourselves in the profession while in school helps increase our opportunities, our career prospects, and our name recognition. Just as it is counterproductive to wait until you finish school to join professional organizations, become active on committees, or put in time working in a library, waiting to write will not help you achieve your goals.