Articles

COUNTER and SUSHI

Peter Shepherd, COUNTER | Dec 28, 2011

The question “What content can we trust?” has always been central to users of scholarly information and there is no simple answer to it.

Traditional indicators of trust have included the reputation of the author and the institute in which her or his research was done; the status of a journal in which an article appears; and the reputation of a particular publisher. More recently, citation data have become a popular, if overused, indicator, and now usage statistics have entered the frame.

In July, in Geneva, Switzerland, the UN World Information Property Organization launched the “Access to Research for Development and Innovation” or aRDi initiative. Participating in the program along with other publishers, Elsevier is providing the content from 28 journals. Eventually aRDi will offer 150 journals made available by STM publishers.

During the 2009 SLA Annual Conference, Doyle Friskney, the associate vice president of information technology and the chief technology officer at the University of Kentucky, gave the talk "Commons, Chaos and Clouds in My CIs: Implications for Higher Education” about smartphones and cloud computing and ramifications in universities. Here, Doyle follows up on that talk and gives additional thoughts about how mobile access is changing the role of academic libraries.

 

Developing MD Consult Mobile

Mike Takats, Elsevier | Dec 29, 2011

MD Consult is the flagship online reference service from Elsevier’s Health Sciences division. Originally a joint venture between W.B. Saunders, Mosby and Lippincott, MD Consult brings reference books, journal articles, Clinics, drug monographs and patient handouts together into one convenient online service — delivering trusted medical information to help physicians make better treatment decisions and improve patient care. This fall we’re extending the service and launching MD Consult Mobile.

The Library in Your Pocket

Wan Wee Pin, National Library Board | Dec 29, 2011

While libraries have been inundated with talk of Web 2.0 technology, social media and the Internet, we’ve failed to notice the mobile revolution taking place. According to Taiwan's Market Intelligence Center (MIC), the number of global mobile users hit 2.3 billion in 2006 and will reach 3 billion by 2010.

Go Mobile

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Yale University Library, Joe Murphy, Yale Science Libraries | Dec 29, 2011

Today's patrons expect information in the palm of the hand. Using cell phones as their primary interface, patrons expect university libraries to seamlessly meet their information needs on the go. Based on a poster we presented at the 2009 ALA Annual Conference, this article discusses leading strategies that innovative academic libraries are using to deliver services through mobile devices. As an example of how we walk the talk, through posting messages, images and slides to Twitter, Facebook and Flickr, we made our ALA poster mobile-accessible in real time.

Funding Innovation

Jay Katzen, Elsevier | Dec 29, 2011

One of our primary goals as a publisher and information solutions provider is to enable advancement in research. Doing that effectively requires that we not only understand and anticipate researchers’ fundamental needs and behaviors, but that we find innovativeways to improve theirworkflows.

The [first] chart shows absolute growth in research between 1996 and 2008, comparing non-Research4Life countries (countries not eligible due to their per capita income or Gross National Income), Band 1 countries (eligible with less than $1,250 GNI) and Band 2 countries (eligible with $1,251 to $3,500 GNI). The [second] chart shows the rise in article output in four countries that participated in Research4Life (Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Bulgaria), compared to Japan, which did not.

The most difficult part of getting published is finding an idea about which you and your colleagues are concerned, and presenting it in a way that makes your thoughts on the subject clear, cogent, and persuasive. If you have already written something up for presentation, you may be well on your way to publication in a professional or scholarly journal. That said, there are some points to remember to help make your journey to publication a smooth one.